The Sea
6 November 2020 - 5 April 2021

The Sea Gives - The Sea Takes”

In the Faroe Islands, there is a fisherman in every family, and all families have experienced losing relatives to the sea. The sea is large, deep and dangerous, but also the country's largest resource and source of income. "The sea gives, and the sea takes," is a phrase often used about the sea, which historically and today has taken many lives.

A strong visual maritime culture

The exhibition shows how the Faroe Islands have built a strong visual maritime culture that depicts the rapid development the country has undergone - through pictures, sculptures, ship models and stamps of the sailors in rowboats, smacks and trawlers. Life in and at sea has always been a key motive for the artists, and the global challenges of the oceans also serve as clues to the artists working on themes such as sustainability and protection of the seas.

Large Ocean Nations

Over the centuries, the fishing industry has evolved from local catches in simple small rowboats to high-tech trawlers on long-distance cruises with huge catches. Today, the Faroe Islands are an expansive and economically prosperous maritime and fishing nation with a large sea territory. The country's sea area is larger than the land area, which means that the Faroe Islands are part of the group of "Large Ocean Nations".

The sea as a border

The many kilometers of coastline mean that the sea can be seen (and heard) almost everywhere, and nowhere on the horizon does another country emerge. The sea therefore forms a natural border with other countries - with the Shetland Islands, Scotland, Iceland and Norway closest.

The sea and fisheries have not surprisingly become a strong community-building marker of what characterizes the Faroe Islands, and thus also a strong visual image of what the Faroe Islands look like. Throughout history, Faroese artists have naturally portrayed the country's maritime development from the coast and at sea.

The UN's global goal

Fishing quotas, blue ocean strategy and sustainable fishing are everyday issues among Faroese people: How does the fishing industry avoid the depletion of marine resources? And how is pollution of the oceans minimized? These are important issues that are addressed not only by Faroese people but also by the world community and in the UN's 17 world goals. World goal 14: “Life in the sea” focuses on how the marine ecosystem is protected and how overfishing and marine pollution shall and must be avoided.

“Life in the sea”

The exhibition will more than just give the visitor a visual experience of the sea around the Faroe Islands translated into images - of the country's many coasts, inlets, the large open sea and fishing as a profession. If art can encourage us to actively decide whether we can do more for a cleaner sea and bring the UN's World Goal 14 “Life in the Sea” to life, we are well on our way.

The exhibition features works by: Tita Vinther, Sigrun Gunnarsdóttir, Jack Kampmann, Sámal Joensen-Mikines, William Heinesen, Bárður Jákupsson, Zacharias Heinesen, Rannvá Kunoy, Edward Fuglø, Frida Zachariasen, Ingálvur av Reyni, Rannvá Holm Mortensen, Elinborg Lützen, Janus Kamban, Tróndur Patursson, Jógvan Waagstein, Jóannis Kristiansen, Randi Samsonsen, Jóna Rasmussen, Heiðrik á Heygum, Ingi Joensen, Kári Svensson, Frimod Joensen, Sven Havsteen-Mikkelsen, William Gislander, Steffan Danielsen, William Smith, Fridtjof Joensen, Olivur við Neyst, Poul Horsdal, Torbjørn Olsen, Amariel Norðoy, Bent Restorff, Flora Heilmann, Guðrið Poulsen, Súsan í Jákupsstovu, Astrid Andreasen, Tóroddur Poulsen.

Back to the exhibition
+298 31 35 79
info@art.fo
Gundadalsvegur 9, P.O. Box 1141 FO-110 Tórshavn, Faroe Islands
Opening hours
From 1 October - 30 April:
Tuesday - Sunday 13.00 - 16.00
Closed on Mondays

From 1 May - 30 September:
Monday - Sunday 11.00 - 17.00
Admission
Adult: 65 DKK
Student: 25 DKK

Groups, min. 12 adults: 50 DKK per person.
Children under 18: free.
+298 31 35 79
info@art.fo
Gundadalsvegur 9, P.O. Box 1141 FO-110 Tórshavn, Faroe Islands